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to the next presidential election. what was a romney loss by 4 would have been a romney loss by 7. i think that is driving part of this. >> following what michael said, the political ramifications. our first read team factors this into the president's overall list of goals, legislation he would like to see passed. let me read this. first read team says if congress passes immigration reform, this discussion about obama's legislative leadership had look like a silly exercise. he will have health care, financial reform, don't ask don't tell repeal, the fiscal cliff deal and immigration trophies on the wall. yet if immigration does not pass, it will be more than fair to note that obama was unable to navigate a divided congress. your reaction to that. >> i think this is certainly very important to the obama legacy in terms of immigration reform being one of his top priorities, if not the top priority for the second term. but he also has guns that was a failure. an upcoming debt debate. there are still quite a few other things that will be on the, on his plans in terms of how his legacy is actua
was elected six times to serve in the state legislature and then this i don't congress. i know what a complicated issue it is. senator from alaska voted against it and then released a statement saying it's dangerous to do any type of policies in an emotional moment. everyone's all worked up. that's now enough. yes it is. having 20 slaughtered children is not enough? come on. senator max baucus gave a little more contrite. he gave an one word response against the gun bill, montana. he does have a point. how many guns there are per each state. in the home state of montana with 120 gun businesses for every 100,000 people. next the senator who voted against it with 104 per 100,000. and right behind him heidi hide camp and mark pryor. the senator from louisiana voted for it. and she's up for re-election. there are heroes on the right republicans senator susan collins mark kirk, putt toomey and john mccain all voted for it. afterwards mccain showed no sympathy for his colleagues who had been cowed by the nr. >> i can't blame any interest group for votes. people who are responsible. drug w
on testimony or questions, rather of max baucus, a democrat we should point out up for re-election. what is his concern, john? >> whenever he goes book to montana we hear from small businesses we don't know what is going on, we don't know what the rules are, we don't know what the costs are. one woman says i have four small business, each are below the 50 threshold to cover my employees. do i have to add up and do i have to cover or don't i? there are no rules or regulations. in this mess very few companies are highering new people because the uncertainty is so great. bill: he said small businesses have no idea what to do. they have no idea what to expect. he goes on to say you need data. do you have any data? you have only given me concepts, frankly and not data. do they not have that? are they still trying to figure it out too? >> jay rockefeller, democratic senator from west begin and one. architects of obamacare, told secretary sebelius a few weeks ago this is the most complicated piece of legislation congress ever passed and so far it is not working. bill: he said if it is not done right t
chavez's successor is due despite widespread reports of election fraud. coming of the likely outcome last how energy prices are shaped ahead. lori: one senator calling the health-care law a train wreck and it was not a republican, it was a democrat. next up that story and lou dobbs will weigh in on it. melissa: time for stocks, let's go to the stock exchange and nicole petallides, another down day for the market. nicole: a hard day, a hard week, volatility return, on monday we down 265 points. following that the following up 157, yesterday we were down 138 and today back and forth 131 and an uncertain feeling in the vix, the fear index remains to the up side and the same time we say something is down something else is hitting new highs and is really a market where you have to pick and choose what you are living these days. the tech having nasdaq is the worst of the bunch down 3/4% anne hathaway in on the nasdaq heavily. we also have jobless claims which showed more claims and that is not great news for the economy. i wanted to take a look two names on the dow jones industrials. one is the
's capital where senators are elected to do the will of the american people and instead, yesterday they did the will of the gun manufacturers and the gun lobby. you can be sure there will be more mass murders more massacres, in the next weeks and next months in this country but most of the united states senators don't give a rat's ass about it. hate to start with that downer but that's the way it is here on the "full court press" this morning. that's mainly what we're going to be talking about and taking your calls about here on this thursday morning. coming to you live from our nation's capital, just down the street from the scene of that cowardly vote yesterday. and take your calls at 1-866-55-press. looking forward to hearing from you and hearing your outrage on twitter at bpshow and on facebook, be our friend on facebook and tell us where the hell we go from here at facebook.com/billpressshow. man, lots to talk about this morning. we're all here. with peter ogborn and dan henning. >> yes sir. >> good morning. >> bill: we come in even on bad days. alichia cruz is here to take your calls.
they had a bad day today was because today it was reported that max baucus would not be seeking re-election to a seventh term as united states senator from montana. the reason this is bad for those people who are working for k street lobbying firm is because with this news they are suddenly far less valuable lobbyists. if you think this is just me cattaraugusi i casting aspersions this was studied and it showed that lobbyists with experience in the office of a u.s. senator suffer a 24% drop in generated revenue when that senator leaves office. baucus land is influence that stretches west from capitol hill where baucus has served for nearly four decades, the first four as a congressman, the past 34 years as senator, out into the vast hill side of lobbying and influence peddling that is washington, d.c. in fact, in such a -- it is such a legendary nation, baucus land the "new york times" saw fit to write an entire article about the universe of people who moved from senator baucus' office to k street. at least 2 aides since 2001 have lobbied on tax issues during the obama administration more t
of people like pat toomey to get back to the middle so they can win elections again and nra is very busy recruiting the angry people to them and that is what this is about. i think we had to have this battle. we may have had to lose this battle in order to galvanize the american people to understand how they are being blackmailed by the far right. >> a lot to go through to get anywhere. mark halpern, bring us into the mindset of someone who voted no here? what was the process of thinking before making that vote? >> well, look. it's a complicated issue and yesterday was an emotional day. i don't want to impugn people's motives. a lot of number of republican senators would have voted different had they not been afraid of the consequences. the president and vice president were emotional yesterday and i think they are struggling how to regroup from this. it's hard for me to see another vote any time soon unless they change the bill slightly. >> mark. >> yeah. >> can i ask, how is this a complicated issue? >> yeah. i really want to know. >> you said -- you said it was a complicated issue. as
arrival he was elected stevens count attorney and served the count for a number of years in that role. that same year don married patricia june davis and spent the next 49 years by her side before her passing in 2001. don later remarried his wife of the past ten years, sharon collins. as a young man, don became interested in politics and at the age of 32 don was elected chairman of the kansas republican federation. the following year don served as chairman of the kansas presidential electors for the election between john f. kennedy and richard nixon. from 1968 to 1970 don served as the chair of the kansas republican party. his zeal for politics kept him involved for many years chairing committees in support of his favorite candidates. he put his name on the ballot one year for governor but fell short by 530 votes in a primary. as a long time kansas resident, don was well known and respected by many throughout our state but especially in southwest kansas. he was such a strong advocate for rural kansas and the special way of life we enjoy in small communities across our state. on severa
them. they think in the general election 4% of the people care most about this issue, even though 91% of the country disagrees with us, we might not pay a political price for it whereas we know the lobby--the gun lobby will make us pay a price for it. isn't that what is wrong with our structurally with the current democracy. >> of course that's what is wrong with it. weakening that lobby is a very important part of it. but also changing the rules of the senate is a part of it that has to meet that weakening halfway. and when you have these senators who are afraid to vote for something because of the grade they're going to get. max baucus when he said why he didn't vote for it, one word, montana. the nra and the crazy support of max baucus. i'm not going to say it's crazy to support max baucus because they got what they wanted but they're so supportive with money you understand why the senators vote in that way. you have to change the structure of the filibuster. noah is right with four democratic senators they only would have gotten to 59 but they shouldn't have to get past 59. they
of power. max baucus is just making a calculation he's up for re-election, he's in a red state. >> sure. that goes into play. you had a lot of -- you also had mccai mccain and toomey listening to the american public. 9 out of 10 people want this to happen. >> you sound so idealistic now. you've written such a cynical piece of work. the point is -- i've seen this in your work and the point is the way democracy actually works on capitol hill is not some sort of simple cause and effect mechanism between the will of the people and the things legislators do. >> certainly not. our show takes a dark look at politics, showing an extreme view how politics can work at its best and worst. >> vince underwood is not bound by ideologically and able to achieve progress because of that. >> what's interesting to me when i moved to washington and started covering capitol hill how surprising to me how common it was. i expected everyone to be true believers. most people were operators. >> ideologically can be quicksand. the republican party is going through re-branding because an ideologically that worked
and the calculations. max baucus is making a calculation, he's up for re-election, he's in a red state. >> sure that goes in to play. but you had a lot of -- you also had mccain, collins and toomey. and we're listening to the american public. nine out of ten people want this to happen. so they voted against -- >> you sound so idealistic now but you have written such a cynical piece of work. the point is, and from -- i've seen this in your work both in the ieds of march. it is not the way that democracy actually works on capitol hill is not some sort of simple cause and effect mechanism between the will of the people, and the things legislators do. >> absolutely not. our show takes a dark look at politics. we are showing an extreme view of how politics can work at its best and worst. underwood is not bound by ideology. in a way he's able to achieve progress because of that. >> what is interesting is that to me when i moved to washington and started to cover capitol hill is how surprising it was to me, how common that was. right? i expected everyone to be like true believers on both sides and it
reelection. my question is you should not be worried about the election. this is too fundamental to go against not only democracy, but denying a vote on the floor of the u.s. senate literally has no justification. >> stephanie: yeah. yeah. literally. the president's press secretary yesterday, jay carney. >> the newtown families are here because their children were murdered. they are asking for the senate to do something that is common sense. >> stephanie: i can't imagine a sadder day for american. the six year olds were blown away at point-blank range, and the united states congress woman who was shot in the face and we can't even get enough democrats to vote for this? where are we politically in america and where do we go from here? >> you may hear from my tone that i'm a little bit of horse. this is a different reaction than i usually have. i write a column purple nation where i try to look at things both ways. i am somewhat astonished but i see no nuance on the question to democrats how could you not allow a vote on this? and i want those names, and they may be f
hispanic voters into the election threat which if history is any indicator would be a good threupbg fo thing for democrats. joe trippi a former howard dean campaign manager and fox news contributor. do you believe the immigration bill on balance would be a bigger net benefit to democratic politicians? >> i think it will benefit both parties. one of the problems that the republicans have had is that their opposition to immigration reform to reaching a compromise has really hurt them in the latino and hispanic communities. it's one of the reasons that after george bush got 4 4% of their votes in 2008 -- swore, excus2004, excuse me. the hispanic support has been declining nationwide. finding a compromise would help republicans start to talk to hispanics. they are much morey lidge justly -- they are a very religious community. there are tkpwrourpbdz on values and other things that republic republicans could talk to the hispanic community and actually start winning their votes again as george bush had reached out to them. in the very beginning as the people become citizens and are eligible
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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